32 Ways to be a jerk to your design clients

jerk to clients

Argue with them about every single change or revision they have. Don’t call them back. Use email instead of phone calls 100% of the time. Talk negatively about them on twitter with fellow designers. Bill them when fixing an error that was clearly yours. Miss your deadlines. Subcontract their work without telling them. Forget about their target audience, design preferences, etc. They don’t know what they want. Submit their email content to Clients from Hell. Treat them like they know

Should you bill your freelance clients for meeting time and other misc. work?

bill my clients for other work graphic design blender

We’ve had tons of reader questions rolling in here at GDB and I absolutely love it! Today’s question comes from Colleen who asks: “Should I be charging for client meetings? [What about taking time to] learn or to learn more about a project…” I think it’s a fantastic question. Essentially, what kind of work should you bill for and what kind of work should you disregard as “overhead costs.” Freelancing vs. Agency Work I used to work at a design

Q&A: Do I need a contract for every design project, even small ones?

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In today’s Q&A episode, I answer a question in a way that might surprise you if you’ve been reading GDB for long. The question is “Do I need a contract for every design project, even the small ones?” If you’re reading this post in an RSS reader or email, click here to view the video. I’d love to hear your take on the whole thing. Leave a comment here.

Q&A: What to do when a freelance client treats you like an employee

Today, in the first episode of our Q&A series, I tackle a question I hear pretty frequently: “How do I handle a freelance client who treats me like an employee?” If you’re reading this post in an RSS reader or email, click here to view the video. Leave a comment here.

Do long-term goals scare or motivate you as a freelancer?

long term goals

I’m about to share a secret with you. Something you probably don’t know (or expect) about me: Long-term goals scare me. Yep. I’m a huge proponent of short-term goals. I wake up every morning reviewing my short term goals in my mind. I live and die by them. And I (mostly) rock my short-term goals. Why I’m afraid of long-term goals I know, I know. It’s crazy talk. How can any entrepreneur, blogger, freelancer, whatever be afraid of long-term goals?

How to start freelancing without quitting your day job (yet)

how to start freelancing

We always hear about the freelancing vs. working for someone else argument. But why are the two ideas always mutually exclusive? I know tons of freelancers who started freelancing on the side of a full-time job and once ends could meet without the job, they ditched the cubicle and made the switch to freelance. But I also know freelancers who started taking some work on the side and realized they hated freelancing. Imagine if they hadn’t tried it first. My

A 30-minute exercise that will make any entrepreneur less stressed, tired and crazy

relax

Entrepreneurs are crazy. And I mean that in a good way. We’re the hustlers of the world. We wake up early to work on our passions. We lay awake at night thinking about our goals. While the rest of the world is sleeping, we’re busy planning our “overnight success.” We think big. Sometimes, if we’re not careful, all of our big thinking and overachieving can come with a hefty price. Most entrepreneurs are exhausted, frazzled, and stressed about their business.

Why most freelancers have less free time than their cubicle counterparts (and how to fix it)

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As I’ve interacted with many of you here at the blog, I’ve been shocked to learn than many full-time freelancers actually have less free time in their days and weeks than many of you who work full-time somewhere else and still manage to pull off a part-time freelance business. Whenever I ask about it, the answers are always the same: everything from “It takes a lot of time to manage a business” to “Business must be good if I’ve got