4 Reasons why every freelancer should work at least one “desk job”

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When I left college, I had no idea how printing presses worked. I didn’t understand why people judged me for how I looked and not what I knew. I knew no one in the design industry except the on-campus staff and students I worked with, and I sure as heck didn’t want one of those crappy, entry-level, junior designer jobs. And then I got my first real design job at a vitamin manufacturing company…as explained by my supervisor, more of

10 mind-shifts you MUST have today to be a successful and happy freelancer

mind shift freelance designer graphic design blender

Stop beating yourself up over little things. Realize that you’re good enough. And acknowledge that your work is worth paying for. These are just a few of the key mind-shifts you’ll need to have if you’re truly going to thrive as a freelancer. Below, you’ll find ten mind-shifts you must have (about your clients, about your work, about your rates, and about your business) if you truly want to be successful. If I’ve left anything out, please let me know

Get paid faster: the best options for getting paid as a freelancer (with fewer fees)

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Recently we received the following question about accepting payments from a GDB reader planning his freelancing debut: Would you recommend I set up a credit card service to receive payments through my future website or is this unnecessary? Is check still the best way to go? These days there are lots of ways to accept payment and the services that make it simple all want a portion of your profits. But all that paperwork nonsense is nonexistent. So here’s a

How to miraculously build a profitable relationship when your client’s budget is low

[IMG] profitable relationship with low-budget client

So you’ve got this potential lead. You meet with them, go over their needs and wants, and you’re all pretty excited about getting started. And then they review your design quote. “Oh. We were thinking more in the <subtract 50%> range.” (Have you heard something like this before?) If you’re anything like me, that’s a BIG difference in cost. Then the anxiety sets in and you start second-guessing yourself…did you quote too high? Are you worth that amount? Is this

The simple two-part recipe to extreme happiness at work

recipe to hapiness at work graphic design blender

Maybe you’re a freelancer or an entrepreneur. Maybe you work in a cubicle. Maybe you run an agency. Or maybe you’re a billionaire CEO. Whoever you are, I’m going to go out on a limb here and guess you have the same desire as the rest of us: You want to be happy at work. Are you happy when you’re working? So, are you happy at work? I mean, not the kind of happy where you’re “just glad to have

GDB redesigned + exciting updates at the blog

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Today I’m very excited to finally launch the redesign of GraphicDesignBlender.com! Take a look around and let us know what you think. We’d love your honest feedback. After all, this is for you. (If you’re reading this in an email, RSS feed, or elsewhere, you can click here to visit GDB and see the redesign yourself.) Let us know what you think by leaving a comment on this post. Together with the launch of this new design, we’re also relaunching

Understanding freelancing insurance + do you need it?

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The Freelancer’s Union recently announced the ability for members to purchase liability insurance. But as freelance designers, do we really need it? Truthfully, when I read the “hey, we’re now offering liability insurance” email, I wondered what, exactly, that entails. According to their website, there are three main types NOTE: I am not a lawyer, nor am I offering professional or legal advice. The following are just my observations and conclusions as a fellow freelance designer. Please seek legal advice

32 Ways to be a jerk to your design clients

jerk to clients

Argue with them about every single change or revision they have. Don’t call them back. Use email instead of phone calls 100% of the time. Talk negatively about them on twitter with fellow designers. Bill them when fixing an error that was clearly yours. Miss your deadlines. Subcontract their work without telling them. Forget about their target audience, design preferences, etc. They don’t know what they want. Submit their email content to Clients from Hell. Treat them like they know