5 Graphic design tips to shave hours off your work week

time

If you work in graphic design, you’re probably only too well aware of the value of good time management. Graphic designers are required to work tight deadlines and navigate around very busy schedules to get projects completed. Shaving even a couple of minutes off design time here and there can benefit your ability to apply yourself fully to a project. What if we were to tell you that there are ways of shaving a couple of hours off your busy

Why repeatedly bending over backwards for a client can actually hurt your relationship

bend-over-backwards

Do you have that one client (okay, maybe three?!) that’s habitually totally unorganized and needing something big last week? The one that asks for an entire PowerPoint presentation for tomorrow’s 8am meeting? (Just 20 slides, I swear! 85 slides later…) Or that calls on Friday at 4:30pm to request a “quick” icon set for Monday morning’s software upgrade? I’m talking about the client that always exhibits this behavior, not the client with one rare instance when they dropped the ball.

How to skip entry-level and find your dream job right out of college

skip entry level

If you are like I was as a University Junior or Senior, you’re chomping at the bit to get out of school. It’s all you can do to keep completing your assignments (especially the ones that feel like busy work). You’re ready to get out there and show the world what you’re made of. You’re ready to get your first “real” job. I’ve been there. (PS: Here at GDB we believe every freelancer should put in a little time at a

Back to the cubicle?! 6 Reasons to work in-house (at least part-time)

work in-house

A design manager recently told me that he has a hard time finding good freelancers who are willing to work in-house. This is at a very well-respected marketing communications firm in Portland, Maine – a town bursting with designers. Why is he having this problem? All jokes aside about freelance designers living in their pjs, it may be time for you to consider working in-house. Maybe you spent years in a corporate or agency setting with the goal of making

If crowdsourcing sites really cared about designers…

It’s a well-known fact: the question of using crowdsourcing sites like 99Designs.com (←link to a GDB interview with 99Designs) or Crowdspring.com is always a hot topic in the design community. When it comes to this issue, I have to admit I have always been somewhat of a fence-sitter. So I decided learn for myself what all the hype was about. Why do so many designers swear by these sites as a great way to find design clients while other designers

How to find design clients

One of the hardest tasks that freelance designers face is that of keeping their client pool thriving. Aside from the clients who come back asking for more, a lot of times, you complete a job for a client and they move on. They leave you with an empty spot in your schedule and, unless you fill it quickly, that means lost income for you. Recently, I posted an open-ended article here on GDB asking readers how to find design clients

NO WAY! 8 Reasons I won’t work for your design shop

GUEST ARTICLE by Tyler Travitz –If you would like to write for GDB, contact me. Thankfully, I’ve been gainfully employed for nearly two years now with an amazing agency. In addition to working on awesome projects for top brands, I have a wonderful employer that provides great benefits, recognizes the life/work balance and is committed to my growth. However, in my search for a great place to work, I have encountered some design shops that are lacking good traits of

The designer’s guide to a great first impression

GUEST ARTICLE by Joe Valdez–If you would like to write for GDB, contact me. We’ve all heard the saying “you don’t get a second chance at a first impression”. When it comes to your design business and landing a deal, nothing could be more true. A great first impression is the first step to securing a client and forming an ongoing business relationship. One of a designer’s main keys to developing a great first impression is trust. No matter what