What to do when a client wants you to copy other designs

Coming from LinkedIn? Let’s get connected! In the graphic and web design industry, we like to think of ourselves as “creatives” who constantly keep the creative juices flowing and come up with original, well-thought out ideas. So why is it that even the best of graphic and web designers are approached by a client now and then who says something like: “I really like the look of this design. Can you just copy it?” I was asked about this just

Avoid design burn-out by limiting client revisions

Beginning a new design project is always exhilarating. You’re energized and excited about working on the project and creating something effective and beautiful. But have you ever had a project that, by the end of it, you just “want to get it done”? You stop caring so much about the design because you’ve been forced to change it so many times since the original concept, you don’t even feel like it’s your work anymore? I’ve been there. This article will

Specialization: a designer’s key to success in the future

I am currently reading “The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding” a phenomenal book about marketing and branding written by Al Ries. One of the laws of effective branding is the law of contraction. Ries explains that companies (and might I venture to add independent designers or freelancers in general) are likely to be more successful if they focus their energies on one specific skill instead of trying to master a number of different ones. Jack of all trades, master of

7 Tips on presenting logos to a client

The research is over. The sketching is finished. Bad ideas now fill your waste basket and the best ideas have made it to the computer screen. After all the hard work, your logos are finally ready to present to the client. But how can you be sure they will be accepted and appreciated by the client? Below are some tips on presenting your logo comps to the client. Follow these rules and your logo proofing is bound to be a

Top designers discuss why they blog

This post contains three great resources to help you understand the importance of blogging as a designer: 1. A list of reasons why all designers should blog. [jump there] 2. Opinions from top designers on why they blog. [jump there] 3. Resources to help you start crafting your first blog or make your current blog better. [jump there] The Story Recently I sat down to lunch with a friend of mine who I hadn’t seen in a while. Rob Johnson

Graphic Design: Hobby or Career?

It has been my experience, as I have connected with other designers [via twitter or other means], that there are a lot of designers out there who seem very involved in the design community but actually have little to no real experience in design. This raised two questions for me (which are addressed is this post): 1. Are most designers I communicate with online avid “Hobbyists” or practicing “Professionals”. 2. Which is more desirable when it comes to graphic design:

28 Things I learned as a full-time graphic designer

I recently decided to make the switch to Freelance Design after working for a local production agency. In this post I have encapsulated some of the most important lessons that I learned while I worked as a full-time designer there. Please feel free to add your suggestions in the comments. The Creative Process 1. Graphic design is a problem-solving process. 2. When you focus on function, a design becomes naturally beautiful. 3. A creative brief is of great importance. 4.

14 Freelance design mistakes you might be guilty of

This article contains a list of common mistakes that freelance designers make. If you enjoy this article you may also want to read “10 Steps to becoming a successful freelance designer” and “22 logo design mistakes you might be guilty of“. Here we go: 1. Charging too much. Unfortunately, we have to face the fact: most people hire a freelance designer above a creative agency because they think they can get a better price. Finding a balance between charging too