Are you taking enough time to build your design business?

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This article brought to you by:Reach out to potential clients with brochures and business cards from UPrinting. Not long ago, I read the E-Myth Revisited (affiliate link), a phenomenal book about entrepreneurship. One of the most life-changing (or I guess you could say business-changing) concepts understood from the book was the importance taking time to build your business. Many entrepreneurs spend too much time working in their business instead of working on their business. This article will explore the best

11 ways to grow your design business in less than an hour

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Whether you are working as a freelance designer, in a design firm, or otherwise, it’s important to be able to help your design business grow on a regular basis. But let’s face it, marketing your design business frequently becomes the “project you’ll get to when you have time”. Since no one is directly paying you for the time you spend building your business, it often gets pushed aside. This article covers 11 simple tips that can build your design business

A creative Post-It Note approach to managing design projects

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Imagine you just landed a dream project from a dream client (you know, the one that says money is no object, pays all up front, and if you ask for something, well, you won’t need to ask for something, it’ll be there already!), and you’re just about to get going, when, all of a sudden, you realise that you need to make sure you do the work right to keep the dream client coming back. So you spend a bit

How to keep design clients coming back for more

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A little while ago, Graphic Design Blender explored the phenomena of clients returning after a serious lapse in time. The article brought up various circumstances and offered solid advice that everyone should take into consideration. But what about those designers who rely on return clients in order to stay in business? How do you keep them coming back and how do you keep all parties involved satisfied? A little background Along with my freelance business, I work at Fox Chase

As a designer, your network affects your net worth

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In a perfect world, clients would just find us and we wouldn’t have to do anything except turn in a beautifully-designed project, collect the accolades, and see our client lists grow. Unfortunately, even for top-quality professionals, achieving steady client growth is sometimes the most difficult. I was fortunate to launch my design firm coming out of a large firm,having worked on some large campaigns. But while my design credentials and background were strong, I had considerably less experience in developing

If crowdsourcing sites really cared about designers…

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It’s a well-known fact: the question of using crowdsourcing sites like 99Designs.com (←link to a GDB interview with 99Designs) or Crowdspring.com is always a hot topic in the design community. When it comes to this issue, I have to admit I have always been somewhat of a fence-sitter. So I decided learn for myself what all the hype was about. Why do so many designers swear by these sites as a great way to find design clients while other designers

7 Golden rules of finding freelance design work

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GUEST ARTICLE by Jay Kaushal–If you would like to write for GDB, contact me. Web and graphic Designers put many years into learning and mastering the skills they need to succeed. When just starting out, they have to go through many difficult situations. Potential employers require a portfolio and prefer someone with working experience. The firm or company knows you are a new-comer and need a break. So the classic catch-22 situation continues endlessly. When you have not worked anywhere

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