When design clients come back from the dead

Doesn’t it feel great when you complete a major project for a client on time and without any huge hang-ups? Of course it does. But what do you do with clients who come back from the dead? Just so that I don’t get in trouble with the law or scare any clients away, a dead client is simply one with whom you do not currently have an open contract. This article will discuss the best practices for the occasion when

OPEN DISCUSSION: How do you find new freelance design clients?

Recently, I have had a lot of people ask me to provide suggestions on finding new freelance design clients. Whether you are a newcomer to the freelance-design field or you just need to give your client pool a boost, there are many ways to find new freelance clients. I would like to change things up just a little and leave this topic up for open discussion. Surely many of you have great questions or tips that you would like to

NO WAY! 8 Reasons I won’t work for your design shop

GUEST ARTICLE by Tyler Travitz –If you would like to write for GDB, contact me. Thankfully, I’ve been gainfully employed for nearly two years now with an amazing agency. In addition to working on awesome projects for top brands, I have a wonderful employer that provides great benefits, recognizes the life/work balance and is committed to my growth. However, in my search for a great place to work, I have encountered some design shops that are lacking good traits of

7 Golden rules of finding freelance design work

GUEST ARTICLE by Jay Kaushal–If you would like to write for GDB, contact me. Web and graphic Designers put many years into learning and mastering the skills they need to succeed. When just starting out, they have to go through many difficult situations. Potential employers require a portfolio and prefer someone with working experience. The firm or company knows you are a new-comer and need a break. So the classic catch-22 situation continues endlessly. When you have not worked anywhere

Custom blog post designs: pros, cons, and best practices

A hot topic among blogging designers is whether or not to create custom blog post designs. If you are unfamiliar with the concept behind custom blog post designs, check out HeartDirected.com, a recent gallery site started by DesignInformer.com‘s Jad Limcaco. Custom designed blog posts can be a great addition to any blog, but I also started thinking the other day about a few setbacks that custom post designs might pose for blogging designers. Below I have compiled a few Pros

Is your design blog hurting your design business?

Whether you are part of a design firm or an independent freelance designer, chances are you blog about design. The design community is enormous and (dare I say) millions of designers share their thoughts online every week. But have you ever paused to consider whether your design blog is helping or hurting your design business? This article will focus on the pro’s and con’s of managing a design blog: ways it might help or hurt your design business. Ways a

Design Essentials 3: Accepting Criticism

In the previous two chapters of Design Essentials, we covered topics that dealt with the quality of your design: Originality, and Attention to Detail. While today’s essential design tip will help your designs look better in the long-run, this chapter deals primarily with the design process and how to openly accept criticism of your designs. Good criticism vs. Bad criticism First, it’s important to understand that there is good criticism and bad criticism. Accepting criticism does not mean you have

Design Essentials 2: Originality

This chapter of Design Essentials will cover the topic of  Originality in design. Originality is the ability to think independently and creatively. So why is it so important that we, as designers, are original thinkers? Put most simply, original designs are more effective. Let’s take a look at the concept of originality in design: But don’t great designers copy? It’s been a popular topic of discussion here on GDB and throughout the design community: do great designers really copy other