How not to get cheated by your design clients

cheated at business

Well that’s an odd headline, isn’t it? Calling out the almighty clients like that? Don’t get me wrong, I’d much rather live in a world where every project reaches its completion and no party gets the short end of the stick at the end of it. But unfortunately, this doesn’t always happen, so we should probably think the possible scenarios through and find some ways to protect ourselves from the ugly. Here’s how to make yourself un-cheat-able. 1. Have a

What kind of contract should I use for small or ongoing projects?

ongoing client contracts

Have you ever struggled to write a contract for ongoing work? You’re not alone. One GDB reader commented: Love the article you posted today about freelance with a contract. I’m curious, I can’t seem to find much out there for inspiration on writing a contract for revolving work. For instance I’m working with an agency that’s giving me production design one-off’s and giving me an hourly rate. I feel like I need to provide them with a contract but I don’t

3 big finance myths successful creatives don’t fall for

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Back in school, I wasn’t big on maths. It wasn’t because I sucked at it or even because I didn’t enjoy it… it was because my maths teacher also happened to be my Truancy Officer and I ditched a lot of classes back then so naturally I used to avoid him like the bubonic plague! I was *almost* a high-school dropout because of all the classes I missed. I remember one day and called me into his office to show

What to do if you’re always “busy” but never “productive” as a freelancer

busy not productive

Let me bring you up to speed on something. You won’t enjoy it, but here it goes anyway: People close to you literally hate it when you say, “I can’t. I’m too busy.” That’s a fact. And don’t get me wrong, they may say that they understand, that they know what your work is about.  But deep down inside they’re thinking, “Damn it, I have a job too, yet somehow I can spare those couple of hours in the evening

What I learned from interviewing 9 successful freelancers

interviewing freelancers

Think of someone you really admire as a freelancer. Have you ever wished you could just contact them out of the blue and ask permission to question them for 20 minutes on a specific topic they’re really knowledgeable in? Last month, that’s just what I did. I interviewed 9 successful freelancers on topics like: hiring employees overcoming self-doubt working with international clients finding your niche teaching design and much more (Stoked members can listen to them for free as they’re

How spying on your competition leads to bigger and better freelance gigs

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Here’s a quiz question for you: How do you grow your business exponentially? Do you: (a) try figuring things out on your own as you go along and improve one step at a time, or (b) spy on people, stealing their processes and adapting them to your business? I guess you can figure out where I’m going with it. Of course, (b) is the right answer. *** This is part three of a three-part miniseries on how to get started

6 Things Successful Freelancers Do Every Friday

successful friday morning

Well, it’s Friday again. In some ways, you’re probably totally jazzed about it. A couple days off (hopefully) from the grind of client phone calls, bills, and the other details of running your business. (It’s a love-hate relationship. I get it.) But on the other hand, where did this whole week go!? Remember on Monday, when you were excited to get started because you had a really fun project ahead of you? Remember that cool marketing idea you had on

Why you should “think big” but “start small” on your business

think big start small

Without a shadow of a doubt, finding a consistent stream of new clients is the main challenge for most freelance designers, and actually most freelancers in general, for that matter. I guess you’d like to land a deal from Coca-Cola or Chrysler to redesign their whole online presence right during your first month on the job, wouldn’t you? That would be great indeed. But as you’d imagine, it’s not very possible. And that’s a good thing because you probably wouldn’t