Pitching to design clients: how to win the account

I had a pretty unusual experience the other day. You see, as a web designer, I am used to visiting clients and pitching my services to them in hopes that I will win the account. But a few days ago, I had the chance to be pitched to for a web project that I simply don’t have the time to do on my own. I sat in interviews with multiple web designers and web design agencies and I LOVED what

Offering price quotes to no-budget design clients

Offering price quotes to potential clients can be one of the most difficult tasks a freelance designer faces. But the difficulty of quoting clients grows exponentially if those clients don’t even offer a ballpark budget for you to work within. No-budget clients make designers play an irritating guessing game in hopes that the quote is close enough to the secret budget amount the client surely has in their head. If you’ve ever had trouble offering a price quote to a

Build your design business by supplementing your design skills

It’s pretty hard to be amazing at everything. Am I right? Granted, there are a few designers out there who are amazing at Print design, branding, print marketing, HTML, CSS, Web programming (PHP etc.), Javascript, and anything else you throw their way. A “Jack of all Trades” you might call them. But most of us are not so fantastic. It’s more common to find a designer who is phenomenal at illustration but can’t code a web site to save his

3 Simple Tips to Keep Your Client Pool Full

Keeping your client pool full is one of the most difficult tasks that any design firm or freelance designer faces. Interestingly enough, it’s also one of the most important aspects of running a design business. After all, if you don’t have clients, you don’t have work. And if you don’t have work, you can’t pay the bills. If you can’t pay the bills, you go out of business. This article will explore various ways you can make sure your client

Take care of your design business, and it will take care of you

I have fellow designers email me all the time with questions and concerns about how to run their design business. Whether they are graphic designers or web designers (or both) most problems seem to be pretty similar. They can’t find clients. They can’t keep the clients they manage to find. They don’t know how to get paid on time. And so on, and so on. You know the drill. Chances are, you have had similar problems (or will experience them

Gain clients and avoid stress with a solid design brief

Every designer wants more clients. More clients usually equates to more income, so it is important to do your best and secure a project from each prospect who engages in your services. Yet securing these projects, and turning prospects into clients, should not depend on just a verbal agreement of terms. No matter your skill level or years in business, a designer or web developer should not enter into a project with a client without a contract. Equally important, however,

Knock their socks off: having the perfect first meeting with a potential design client

You go to a networking meeting, or the grocery store, or someone’s birthday party… Somehow you get talking about what you do and before you know it there’s a spark and they become a potential client. You exchange business cards and schedule a time to meet – perhaps in your office, or a lovely, quaint coffee shop down the street – and both of you are ecstatic that you’ve met each other, and excited to get started. This article will

Empower your design with mind maps

When starting a new design project, it is often difficult to decide where to start from. Ideas can flow from the brain like a waterfall and so it’s hard to remember them for later use. In my experience, I’ve found that the mind mapping of ideas is the best and most powerful way to get real benefits from those ideas. It’s also a life-saver for the early stages of the design process. What follows is a brief explanation on how